The main difference between collision and comprehensive coverage comes down to the question of what the driver controls. Collision insurance will cover events within a motorist's control or when another vehicle collides with your car. Comprehensive coverage generally falls under "acts of God or nature," or things that are typically out of your control when driving. These can include events such as a spooked deer, a heavy hailstorm, or a carjacking.
Because her car’s so old, her savings are less: $168 to $204 in a year. But in this case, it could be wise for the driver to drop collision. If she were at fault in an accident, collision coverage would pay for repairs only up to the value of the car minus the deductible, or about $1,750. Is it worth repairing a car that wasn’t in great shape to begin with?
The cheapest car insurance, period, will likely carry the minimum coverage required in your state. In most states, this is liability insurance only, which covers property damage and medical bills for others due to accidents you cause. Some states also require uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage, which pay for your injuries or damage if an at-fault driver doesn’t have enough insurance.

Are you looking for cheap auto insurance but worried about sacrificing quality and service in favor of a more affordable rate? GEICO has you covered. The word "cheap" might be scary when it comes to an auto insurance policy, but it doesn't have to be this way. With GEICO, cheap car insurance means something completely different. It's affordable. It's good for your budget. All while providing you with 24/7 customer service and top-of-the-line insurance for your vehicle.
Comprehensive car insurance covers damages from an "act of God," or events that are not caused by a car driving into something else. An "act of God" can include things like damage from a heavy tree branch falling on your car. Since you have no control over when or why a tree branch would fall on your car, this kind of accident would be covered under your comprehensive policy.
×