In the 2018 midterm elections, ballot measures passed in both Missouri and Utah legalizing the use of medical marijuana. This means that in total, 32 states and Washington D.C. now allow for the medicinal use of cannabis. So can you use your health insurance to help pay for it? Due to the U.S. government's classification of the plant as a Schedule I drug, you can't use Medicare to pay for medical marijuana because it technically doesn't have any accepted medical use. Private insurers won’t cover it either, partially because the Food and Drug Administration hasn’t approved it for use. If you’re outside of the U.S. you’ll have more luck. With the legalization of recreational marijuana use in Canada in 2018, Sun Life Financial is now offering plans that cover medical marijuana use.


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Allstate is more reasonable in terms of pricing, and it came out cheapest for drivers under age 25 in our quotes. Consumer Reports readers rated it just a hair lower than State Farm in overall satisfaction, but Allstate pulled ahead in J.D. Power ratings with a superior score in agent interaction. There’s no denying that Allstate is popular in Texas, with the second-most market share of any company at roughly 11.7%. It’s also one of the only companies to offer “gap” insurance for new cars, something that State Farm is missing. And if your Allstate quote is lower than those from its competitors, it could mean the difference in whether you can afford comprehensive and/or UM/UIM coverage, two especially valuable add-ons in Texas.
We found premiums to be up to $600 more per year in some cases, but your personal results will vary based on your medical history and needs. It's easy to see what your own costs might be if you take a few minutes to enter your information on the website. The website is also very easy to use as you can filter plan options or compare them side-by-side with a couple clicks. There are also pop-up windows that explain certain terms if you hover your mouse over them. While some companies only operate in a select few states, UnitedHealthcare is nationwide, so there’s no need to worry about being in a coverage area.
Auto insurance rates in California are among the most expensive in the nation, with annual premiums of $1,665 per year on average. Additionally, auto coverage rates in the state have increased 13% from 2017 to 2019 across the 10 largest insurers. While some price hikes are unavoidable, the best way to get low rates is to shop around and compare quotes.

One of the big perks of insuring your home through Metlife is that they offer guaranteed replacement cost coverage – meaning if your home or stuff is damaged or destroyed by a covered peril, your home’s rebuild costs and property will receive the full replacement cost, depreciation notwithstanding. That means if your home is only worth $250,000 but it costs $500,000 to replace, Metlife will pay the full $500,000 to replace your home.
This longstanding insurance company has a lot of options, so there's sure to be a comprehensive plan that meets your needs. Blue Cross Blue Shield is a nationwide provider made up of local independently operated companies. This means the coverage is broad but can vary depending on where you live. There are more plans compared to other insurance providers we evaluated. In fact, we were given a choice of about 20 plans during testing. There is a side-by-side comparison feature that outlines specific costs and benefits with a pop-up window that shows you even more information about each. 
NerdWallet compared quotes from these insurers in ZIP codes across the country. Rates are for policies that include liability, collision, comprehensive, and uninsured/underinsured motorist coverages, as well as any other coverage required in each state. Our “good driver” profile is a 40-year-old with no moving violations and credit in the “good” tier.
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