A lot goes into an auto insurance rate quote, including your ZIP code, coverage levels, marital status, annual mileage, driving history and vehicle make, year and model. In most states, your gender and credit history are also used to determine rates. And again, the reason auto insurance comparison shopping is so important is because rates between companies are different for each person, too.

Health insurance is now available to more Americans than ever before. Subsidized options are easily available to low-income individuals and families. In the past, many people took the risk of not being insured, but with the Affordable Care Act (ACA) you can be fined if you don't have qualified health care insurance. Instead of paying a fine, people who have not been able to afford insurance before are looking for affordable medical insurance options.


The best car insurance companies in Florida with the highest ratings are: AAA, Southern-Owners Insurance, Amica, Florida Farm Bureau and Safeco. As we mentioned above, Florida Farm Bureau Insurance ranked as the cheapest auto insurance company in Florida, so it's great to see that they are also one of the top-rated auto insurers in the state. GEICO, State Farm and Progressive—three of the largest auto insurers in Florida—perform better than average as well, with relatively low complaint index numbers. At the other end were Windhaven, Ocean Harbor and First Acceptance, which received the most complaints relative to their market share size.
Each insurance company evaluates personal factors in its own way, and they keep their methods as hidden as possible. So we can’t tell you which company puts high value in your occupation or emphasizes a clean driving history more than others. But to help you get going, we can show you a car insurance rate comparison for the same hypothetical driver and car, using average rates from across the country.
The cheapest car insurance, period, will likely carry the minimum coverage required in your state. In most states, this is liability insurance only, which covers property damage and medical bills for others due to accidents you cause. Some states also require uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage, which pay for your injuries or damage if an at-fault driver doesn’t have enough insurance.
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