The type of vehicle you insure will impact your car insurance rate. Insuring a large truck or luxury vehicle is more expensive than insuring a sedan with standard trim. This is because collision and comprehensive coverage are designed to replace your vehicle in the event of an accident. The more it costs to replace your vehicle, the more it costs to insure it. Simple as that.

While you might want to finish shopping for car insurance as quickly as possible, it’s important to do your due diligence and find the right company. At the end of the day, car insurance is designed to protect and benefit you. If you were to be injured or have your car totaled in an accident, your insurer’s customer service and claims satisfaction would be vital.


The life insurance market has shrunk by around 4% over the last ten years. Interestingly, the market shrunk after the recession then grew about 51% between 2010 and 2015, though it has since begun to drop in size again. In 2017, life insurance premiums exceeded the amount spent in four of the past five years, but still came short of levels seen in 2008 and 2015. Check out our graph below to see how the market has fluctuated in the last decade. All numbers in billions.
It’s important to note that every company considers credit very differently, and even among insurers this factor fluctuates by state. For example, NerdWallet’s 2019 car insurance rate analysis indicates that while State Farm charges higher rates for poor credit in many states, it doesn’t seem to do so in Maine. Similar variations are true for many other companies as well.
If you have very poor credit, the cheapest car insurance company is Nationwide. Here, your premium will be more than $435 less than the group average. Compared to the highest credit level, drivers with bad credit pay nearly $1,450 more per year for auto insurance. If you pay off a loan or otherwise improve your credit score, you should shop around for car insurance as your premium should change. Just another reason to keep your score up!

A history of chronic disease or other potential health issues with an individual or family, such as heart disease or cancer, may result in paying higher premiums. Obesity, alcohol consumption, or smoking can affect rates as well. An applicant typically goes through a medical exam to determine whether he has high blood pressure or other signs of potential health issues that may result in premature death for the applicant and increased risk for the insurance company. People in good health typically pay lower life insurance premiums.
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