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If you’re drawn to the minimalist and tiny home movement, or simply enjoy traveling for a living, you’re probably interested in buying an RV. Travel trailers are still the most popular and common RVs, with many families opting for the larger, bus-sized motorhomes. Whichever you decide, it’s beneficial to analyze your family’s individual needs and weigh the pros and cons. 
Bus-home conversions are a rapidly-growing trend that several RV insurance companies are adapting into their policies. The type of bus, however, is a prominent deciding factor in coverage, since bus axles differ from traditional RVs and aren’t built to carry a certain amount of weight. Many RV insurance companies avoid school bus-converted homes, as they have a higher risk of rollover accidents. Also, your bus-converted home must be registered as a recreational vehicle for personal use to be eligible for RV-insurance. Depending on the state where you register your vehicle, it may require your bus to comply with several requirements and meet certain standards before registration. It’s important that you check with your local department of motor vehicles beforehand.
According to the Insurance Information Institute’s table of Automobile Financial Responsibility Laws by State, 49 out of all 50 states, as well as the District of Columbia, require you to have some sort of liability coverage for all vehicles on the road, including RVs. The only exception to this rule is the state of New Hampshire, which has no mandatory insurance law, and only requires financial responsibility from the person at fault in a car accident.

Lastly, National General has discounts that are aimed at attracting supporters and members of certain organizations. For example, active and retired General Motors employees, current employees of General Motors suppliers, such as Chevrolet, Hummer, and Pontiac, OnStar subscribers, and GM/GMAC customers are all eligible for discounts on their premiums.
An insurance provider and you might not consider your RV to be worth the same. By settling on an agreed value with your potential RV insurance provider, you are ensuring that both you and your insurance company have the same value of your RV in mind if you face a worst-case scenario—the total loss of your RV. It’s also important to ask about the next lower threshold for an agreed value premium. By agreeing to a slightly lower level of coverage, you might be able to save plenty on your premiums.
All of these vehicles are a bargain to insure but insurance prices have definitely gone up from last year. Our cheapest option, the Odyssey, costs $1,298 to insure compared to the last year’s top choice, the Jeep Wrangler, which ran $1,169. This is an 11 percent increase. The Jeep Wrangler saw a significant rate increase, going from $1,169 to $1,304, a jump of $135 or 11.5 percent.

However, there are some circumstances where RV insurance is always required, even if it’s a towable model. For example, if you’re renting or financing your RV, both renters and lenders will want to make sure that they’ll be properly reimbursed in case of an accident or loss, and will require you to acquire an insurance policy before allowing you to take them on the road.


If you live in an area with unusual state regulations or heightened risk of weather-related claims, shopping car insurance options will be vital. Not every car insurance company offers policies in every state, which can make pricing less competitive. If you live in storm-prone states like Louisiana or Florida, you might find it harder to get a competitive rate.
Many baby boomers are doing the same: spending their retirement visiting national parks, historic landmarks, and exploring the country. Empty nesters and the 55+ crowd find that RV living offers both freedom and a strong sense of community. Contrary to the popular belief that RVers are constantly on the move, RV and manufactured home parks also serve as seasonal homes, with plenty of things to do to keep an active lifestyle.

Auto insurance premiums depend on the insured party's driving record. A record free of accidents or serious traffic violations typically results in a lower premium. Drivers with histories of accidents or serious traffic violations may pay higher premiums. Likewise, because mature drivers tend to have fewer accidents than less-experienced drivers, insurers typically charge more for drivers below age 25.
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