The above is meant as general information and as general policy descriptions to help you understand the different types of coverages. These descriptions do not refer to any specific contract of insurance and they do not modify any definitions, exclusions or any other provision expressly stated in any contracts of insurance. We encourage you to speak to your insurance representative and to read your policy contract to fully understand your coverages.
Bus-conversion homes are a popular and fast-growing trend within the RV lifestyle. City buses, Greyhounds, and even school buses are highly sought after and, once renovated, become non-traditional RVs that fall into the Class A category. While bus renovation projects are becoming mainstream, they can be difficult to insure. Buses, especially school bus-converted homes or “Skoolies,” are considered more of a risk due to their weight and balance limitations. Vehicles originally built for mass transportation do not have the same axle and weight distribution as traditional RVs, which are designed for sleeping and carrying additional living necessities.
It’s more than a car and it’s not quite a house, which is why it can be so challenging to find the right coverage for your home on wheels at an affordable rate. So, whether you need RV insurance, motorhome insurance or trailer insurance, the AARP® Auto and Homeowners Insurance Program1 from The Hartford offers specialized protection for your home-sweet-home away from home.
Bus-conversion homes are a popular and fast-growing trend within the RV lifestyle. City buses, Greyhounds, and even school buses are highly sought after and, once renovated, become non-traditional RVs that fall into the Class A category. While bus renovation projects are becoming mainstream, they can be difficult to insure. Buses, especially school bus-converted homes or “Skoolies,” are considered more of a risk due to their weight and balance limitations. Vehicles originally built for mass transportation do not have the same axle and weight distribution as traditional RVs, which are designed for sleeping and carrying additional living necessities.
Most of our top picks offer a slew of discounts, so be sure to check out each company’s available options. Typically, you’ll save money if you’re able to bundle your auto and RV insurance together. Some providers also offer discounts for having a membership to an RV club or completing RV training/safety courses. Additionally, many insurers consider you less of a risk if your RV is equipped with updated safety features like air bags, anti-lock brakes, and anti-theft devices. And remember: The fewer traffic violations you have, the lower your premium will be.
When judging coverage and benefits, we singled out RV insurance carriers that offered extensive and flexible coverage options. To be considered for our list, companies had to provide all the traditional insurance protection, as well as a healthy amount of RV-specific options. Most RV insurers offer liability, personal injury protection (PIP), collision, underinsured or uninsured motorist, and comprehensive coverage. Other types, such as full-timer and Mexico coverage, vary in availability from company to company.
RV insurance isn’t the same thing as auto insurance, though many providers give you the option to bundle the two. But RVs have specialized concerns. To start, they can carry many more people than cars, and they cost more to repair. In addition to basic coverage, RV insurance can also offer more extensive protection, with coverage for personal belongings, emergency expenses for lodging, and higher damage rates.
Nationwide offers more discounts than most other providers, and you’ll likely be eligible for at least one. Discounts are offered for switching from another provider, paying your annual premium upfront, driving safely, not filing any claims in the previous insurance period, and having membership in Nationwide’s Affinity Group. Nationwide is also one of the only providers that will reward you for enrolling in an RV safety course.
Looking at a 20-year term life insurance policy (the most popular option) worth $500,000, we've determined what the average annual rates are for individuals between the ages of 25 and 65. One of the clear takeaways from the table: it's expensive to smoke. Smokers on average will pay an average of 260% higher premiums for their life insurance policies than non-smokers. This disparity is greatest for those between the ages of 40 and 55, with 40-year-old smokers paying over three times as much for their life insurance as non-smokers, while 25-year-old smokers pay only twice as much.
The Honda Odyssey moved back into the top spot this year after dropping to second place last year, behind the Jeep Wrangler. The Odyssey costs a mere $1,298 a year to insure. That’s $514 less than the national average of $1,812. In 2010, the first year Insure.com began its rankings of new models’ insurance costs, the Odyssey cost $1,095 to insure, so its coverage price has increased just $203 in nine years.
Life insurance premiums depend on the age of the insured party. Because younger people are less likely to die than older people, younger people typically pay lower life insurance costs. Gender plays a similar role. Because women tend to live longer than men, women tend to pay lower premiums. Engaging in risky activities increases insurance costs. For example, a racecar driver faces an increased risk of death and, as a result, may pay high life insurance premiums or be denied coverage.
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