While not all large insurance companies are the same, some of them might be selling insurance policies for vehicles that they do not have much experience covering. RV insurance in particular is offered by many auto insurance companies who may not be well prepared for handling the intricacies of an RV insurance claim. When choosing who is going to insure your vehicle, make sure it is a provider who specializes in RV insurance—regardless of its size—or that at least has a good track record of dealing with RV insurance policies and claims.

It’s more than a car and it’s not quite a house, which is why it can be so challenging to find the right coverage for your home on wheels at an affordable rate. So, whether you need RV insurance, motorhome insurance or trailer insurance, the AARP® Auto and Homeowners Insurance Program1 from The Hartford offers specialized protection for your home-sweet-home away from home.

Lastly, National General has discounts that are aimed at attracting supporters and members of certain organizations. For example, active and retired General Motors employees, current employees of General Motors suppliers, such as Chevrolet, Hummer, and Pontiac, OnStar subscribers, and GM/GMAC customers are all eligible for discounts on their premiums.

While some auto insurance policies extend liability coverage for towable RVs, they are still significantly large investments, especially if your RV is financed or is a motorhome in which you live. Most RVs contain personal belongings, home essentials, and attachments, all of which require coverage beyond what’s offered in a basic car insurance policy. For this reason, RV insurance usually has comprehensive coverage plans, which covers personal injury, theft, and natural disasters in addition to liability. RV insurance providers also offer a variety of specialized coverage options.
But liability coverage levels come in threes — you’ll probably see something like 50/100/50 up to 250/500/250 in typical policies. You can think of these limits like: individual injuries / total injuries / property damage. Insurers are a little more technical, calling them bodily injury liability, total bodily injury liability and physical damage liability.
State legislators set limits on how much a company can increase your rates after a crash. Our hypothetical accident resulted in only $2,000 worth of damage. That caused average annual rates to spike by $1,000 or more in some states, while others jumped by far less. One thing’s for sure: Your rates will definitely increase after an at-fault accident, so be sure to compare car insurance rates if you have one on record.
A history of chronic disease or other potential health issues with an individual or family, such as heart disease or cancer, may result in paying higher premiums. Obesity, alcohol consumption, or smoking can affect rates as well. An applicant typically goes through a medical exam to determine whether he has high blood pressure or other signs of potential health issues that may result in premature death for the applicant and increased risk for the insurance company. People in good health typically pay lower life insurance premiums.
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