Bus-home conversions are a rapidly-growing trend that several RV insurance companies are adapting into their policies. The type of bus, however, is a prominent deciding factor in coverage, since bus axles differ from traditional RVs and aren’t built to carry a certain amount of weight. Many RV insurance companies avoid school bus-converted homes, as they have a higher risk of rollover accidents. Also, your bus-converted home must be registered as a recreational vehicle for personal use to be eligible for RV-insurance. Depending on the state where you register your vehicle, it may require your bus to comply with several requirements and meet certain standards before registration. It’s important that you check with your local department of motor vehicles beforehand.
So now that we understand the difference between auto and RV coverage, let’s take a look at the specifics of what you get under an RV policy. Essentially, RV insurance acts as a hybrid between car and home insurance, offering additional protection for home and living essentials through specialized coverage plans. Depending on the policy you choose, it may include:
Nationwide offers more discounts than most other providers, and you’ll likely be eligible for at least one. Discounts are offered for switching from another provider, paying your annual premium upfront, driving safely, not filing any claims in the previous insurance period, and having membership in Nationwide’s Affinity Group. Nationwide is also one of the only providers that will reward you for enrolling in an RV safety course.

Car sales stayed pretty flat last year with 17,274,250 vehicles driving off of dealer lots. This is a measly 0.3 percent increase over last year. The pain (for automakers) will continue in 2019, according to National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA). The NADA is forecasting vehicle sales of 16.8 million, which would represent about a 1.1 percent decline.
“Florida has a larger percentage of riskier drivers,” points out Karen Kees, press secretary at the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation. “There are a high number of students due to the many universities in Florida, older drivers due to the large number of retirement communities, and drivers unfamiliar with the local roads due to our popularity with tourists.”
Our motorhome insurance offers many of the same benefits as our car insurance plans plus additional features to address the risks specific to your type of RV and how you use it. That means you can enjoy the same quality insurance coverage and value for your money while adding in all the extras your motorhome needs at a rate you can afford. Speak with your insurance agent or a specialist at The Hartford; we’ll help you choose the RV insurance coverage that’s right for your vehicle. Get an RV insurance quote today to learn more.
Most car insurance providers will offer to include your RV as part of your auto insurance policy, as such you will get traditional car insurance coverage. This will include bodily injury and property damage liability coverage, personal injury protection, collision, comprehensive, medical payments, and uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage, which essentially protects you against accidents and physical damage while on the road. (For a more detailed explanation of coverage see below.)  
Life insurance premiums depend on the age of the insured party. Because younger people are less likely to die than older people, younger people typically pay lower life insurance costs. Gender plays a similar role. Because women tend to live longer than men, women tend to pay lower premiums. Engaging in risky activities increases insurance costs. For example, a racecar driver faces an increased risk of death and, as a result, may pay high life insurance premiums or be denied coverage.
×