Liability insurance usually includes bodily injury coverage and property damage coverage. Bodily injury coverage is designed to cover all of the other party’s medical expenses resulting from any injuries received in an accident for which you’re at fault, while property damage coverage helps cover the costs of any damage to another person’s property, such as vehicle repairs, replacements, or damaged structures resulting from said accident.
Specialized RV coverage might sound expensive, but its more affordable than you might think. Once you factor in all the available discounts and take advantage of sensible, money-saving coverage features like the Storage Option, you could be saving hundreds over the course of a year. If you’re trying to protect your RV with insurance coverage that’s suited for a car, then you’re putting it at risk.
The amount of insurance your RV requires will mainly depend on the type of motorhome or towable you own, how often you use it, and whether you plan to reside in it for six or more months out of the year. There are two types of recreational vehicles, the towable trailer and the motorhome, which falls into three categories: Class A, B or C motorhomes. Class A motorhomes are the largest and tend to be the most expensive. They often include luxury features, customized amenities, and permanent attachments that may require additional protection. Class B vehicles are the smallest type of RV, also known as “camper vans,” and are generally much cheaper to insure than larger motorhomes. Class C vehicles are a hybrid of Class A and B.
Insurers don't determine your actual cash value (ACV) settlement based on what you owe, but rather on what the car is worth just prior to the accident. Let's say you owe $20,000 on your new car, but it's only worth about $16,000. If your car is totaled, you might get a settlement check of $16,000 but still owe an additional $4,000 on your loan or lease.
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