Auto insurance is financial protection, and not just for the investment you made when you bought your car. After a really serious accident, bills for damage and injuries can easily reach into hundreds of thousands of dollars. If you happen to cause such a wreck, the victims could sue you. In the worst case scenario, assets such as your savings and home could be seized.
RV insurance isn’t the same thing as auto insurance, though many providers give you the option to bundle the two. But RVs have specialized concerns. To start, they can carry many more people than cars, and they cost more to repair. In addition to basic coverage, RV insurance can also offer more extensive protection, with coverage for personal belongings, emergency expenses for lodging, and higher damage rates.
While JD Power-recommended companies above aren’t among the cheapest of the insurance companies we’ve examined, they might suit your needs. It’s important to think beyond price to find a comfortable middle ground between claims satisfaction and affordability. Use The Zebra’s side-by-side insurance comparisons to avoid some of the legwork involved in insurance shopping.
If you live in your RV full-time for more than six months of the year, Allstate will not be able to insure your RV. Because of that, Allstate is a more suitable provider for people who only use their RVs occasionally: Its policies include basic coverage, sound system coverage, personal belongings coverage, medical payment, roadside assistance, and rental reimbursement.
This year’s rankings are dominated by SUVs and CUVs, which matches what is happening in the automotive market. According to industry tracker, LMC Automotive, 84 percent of the vehicles sold by General Motors in the U.S. market will be a truck or SUV by 2022. Ford's ratio of SUV and truck sales will grow to 90 percent and Fiat Chrysler's could hit 97 percent.
Admittedly, we originally approached this topic with the traditional opinion that RVs were mainly of interest to retirees, the baby boomers who enjoy spending their post-work life experiencing the great outdoors. While this segment of the population has long been the backbone of the RV industry, the new trend of working remotely while traveling is attracting much younger consumers to the RV lifestyle.
One of Progressive’s add-on coverages includes a “disappearing deductible” option. This means that each year you don’t file a claim, Progressive will drop your rate by 25%. With this method, the company boasts that you could eventually have a $0 deductible. But it only stays this way as long as you haven’t filed a claim — if you do, your deductible will go right back up. Safeco also incentivizes safe driving with low deductibles. Safeco will reduce your collision deductible by $100 each year you don’t have a claim, but this incentive caps at $500.
The Good Sam Insurance Agency replaces any RV that is totaled or stolen in its first five model years with a new, comparable RV model. This stands even if the customer is not the original owner of the vehicle. After the first five model years, customers receive the full original purchase price toward the purchase of a replacement RV. This Full Replacement Cost Coverage option protects customer RVs from depreciation, potentially saving them thousands of dollars.

Regardless of how often you use your RV, Safeco is worth a look. Safeco offers coverage for anyone who lives in an RV fewer than 250 days (about eight months). While this won’t cover policyholders who live in their RV full-time, it serves as a nice middle-ground for people who only plan to store their RV away during the winter months, for instance.


Our motorhome insurance offers many of the same benefits as our car insurance plans plus additional features to address the risks specific to your type of RV and how you use it. That means you can enjoy the same quality insurance coverage and value for your money while adding in all the extras your motorhome needs at a rate you can afford. Speak with your insurance agent or a specialist at The Hartford; we’ll help you choose the RV insurance coverage that’s right for your vehicle. Get an RV insurance quote today to learn more.


A history of chronic disease or other potential health issues with an individual or family, such as heart disease or cancer, may result in paying higher premiums. Obesity, alcohol consumption, or smoking can affect rates as well. An applicant typically goes through a medical exam to determine whether he has high blood pressure or other signs of potential health issues that may result in premature death for the applicant and increased risk for the insurance company. People in good health typically pay lower life insurance premiums.
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