So now that we understand the difference between auto and RV coverage, let’s take a look at the specifics of what you get under an RV policy. Essentially, RV insurance acts as a hybrid between car and home insurance, offering additional protection for home and living essentials through specialized coverage plans. Depending on the policy you choose, it may include:


Though Safeco’s app boasts a high 4.7 rating with over 5,000 ratings in the Apple App Store and an average 4.1 rating in Google Play, the reviews tell a different story. The most common complaint is that the app simply redirects you to the Safeco website, which is poorly formatted for mobile use. Many reviews also report that the app routinely crashes, which frustrated customers enough that they deleted the app and used their computers to access the Safeco website. The company has responded to say that it is actively working on improving functionality and adding offline features, but in the meantime, it’s likely that using the app is a frustrating experience.
Most of our top picks offer a slew of discounts, so be sure to check out each company’s available options. Typically, you’ll save money if you’re able to bundle your auto and RV insurance together. Some providers also offer discounts for having a membership to an RV club or completing RV training/safety courses. Additionally, many insurers consider you less of a risk if your RV is equipped with updated safety features like air bags, anti-lock brakes, and anti-theft devices. And remember: The fewer traffic violations you have, the lower your premium will be.
The auto insurance rates displayed in our articles are based on the 2019 results of The Zebra’s comprehensive car insurance pricing analysis. In the analysis of all US zip codes — including Washington D.C. — our user profile consisted of a 30-year-old single male driving a 2013 Honda Accord. To generate pricing specific to particular rating factors, we adjusted the driving profile based on pricing factors commonly used by car insurance companies.
Further examples are the company’s storage option and low mileage discount—both great solutions for part-time RVers. Baby Boomers are more likely to own a home and those that were born between 1946 and 1964 are now heading into retirement. This makes them more prone to RV part-time rather than full-time when compared to Millennials, for example. Some Baby Boomers end up making their RVs a home-on-wheels, but many are also likely to take their RV out for vacation with their families, or to explore the great outdoors for certain seasons or periods of time.

According to the Insurance Information Institute’s table of Automobile Financial Responsibility Laws by State, 49 out of all 50 states, as well as the District of Columbia, require you to have some sort of liability coverage for all vehicles on the road, including RVs. The only exception to this rule is the state of New Hampshire, which has no mandatory insurance law, and only requires financial responsibility from the person at fault in a car accident.
Tech-savvy consumers have probably heard of or have been inspired by the “digital nomad” lifestyle, where people have been ditching their office cubicles to work remotely. Social media strategists, photographers, and web designers can all work from the comfort of home, as long as there’s a stable internet connection. Hit TV shows such as HGTV’s Tiny House Hunters and Travel Channel’s Going RV are shining a light on younger couples and families that save money by downsizing to a motorhome for a non-traditional life on the road.
I don't believe it is fair that insurance companies are allowed, by law, to check your credit report. I have worked my fingers to the bone to attain good credit. My credit score was excellent. After having a new HVAC system put in it went down to "good." My car insurance went up $139. It it very unfair to pay more for insurance because my debt increased. My finances should not be any business of the insurance companies. I always pay my bills on time and have never been late with a premium payment. So So UNFAIR!!

We evaluated each company’s track record with its customers by looking at the available complaint data on online regulatory organizations' pages and by searching for company pages on independent consumer review websites such as the Better Business Bureau. Some companies also provide unfiltered reviews on their own websites, helping to give greater insight into customer satisfaction rates.

Unfortunately, the cost of claims has been rising in recent years for cars on both sides of the list, mainly due to technology. “All of the sensors and other technology in today's cars have pushed up the cost of insurance claims,” says Walker. What was once a minor repair has become much more complex and costly. Complicated repairs also add to the time a car spends in the repair shop and usually requires the use of a rental car.”


By law, any type of registered vehicle must be insured. Motorhomes, like cars, are required to at least have liability insurance. Travel trailers and other towable RVs, on the other hand, cannot be driven and therefore aren’t required to have insurance. Keep in mind that towable RVs, although not vehicles, are still susceptible to theft, damage from natural disasters, vandalism, and collision, so it is highly recommended for them to still have coverage.
The Honda Odyssey moved back into the top spot this year after dropping to second place last year, behind the Jeep Wrangler. The Odyssey costs a mere $1,298 a year to insure. That’s $514 less than the national average of $1,812. In 2010, the first year Insure.com began its rankings of new models’ insurance costs, the Odyssey cost $1,095 to insure, so its coverage price has increased just $203 in nine years.
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A history of chronic disease or other potential health issues with an individual or family, such as heart disease or cancer, may result in paying higher premiums. Obesity, alcohol consumption, or smoking can affect rates as well. An applicant typically goes through a medical exam to determine whether he has high blood pressure or other signs of potential health issues that may result in premature death for the applicant and increased risk for the insurance company. People in good health typically pay lower life insurance premiums.
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